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dc.contributor.advisorMelnyk, William
dc.contributor.authorPratt-Poskus, D. A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T13:07:17Z
dc.date.available2017-06-06T13:07:17Z
dc.date.created1983
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/2189
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the importance of cognitions in the feelings of self-control on task performance and on certain subjective states, via electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training. Subjects in a "misled” EMG feedback group were led to believe that they had successfully reduced their EMG levels (induced cognition of self control); in actuality, the subjects in the misled group were yoked to subjects receiving feedback contingent oii their ovv'n EMG levels; thus, the feedback received by the misled group ’vvas that of their contingent EMG feedback counterparts. The effects of this treatment v/ere explored in relation to feelings of self control via Rotter's I-E scale, EMG task performance during two training trials, state-trait anxiety levels via the 3tate-Tra.it Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and other subjective states via some self-report questionnaires. These data were compared to those of the EMG group receiving feedback contingent on their own EMG levels and to a control group which was also yoked to the contingent feedback group, but who were informed that this was the case.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectElectromyography.
dc.subjectBiological control systems.
dc.subjectLocus of control.
dc.titleLocus of control and expectation of control in EMG biofeedback / D.A. Pratt-Poskus. --
etd.degree.nameM.A.
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplinePsychology
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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