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dc.contributor.advisorSong, T. M. K.
dc.contributor.authorCipriano, Nick.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T13:08:39Z
dc.date.available2017-06-06T13:08:39Z
dc.date.created1979
dc.date.issued1979
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/2243
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate, 1) the effect of seasonal wrestling training on aerobic and anaerobic power, physical working capacity (170), resting, maximal and recovery heart rate, 2) to determine the effect of unavoidable interventions in the training program, and 3) to determine whether peak levels were found on the parameters just prior to the College and National wrestling championships. The research design selected was a repetitive bi-weekly testing schedule for physical working capacity (170), recovery heart rate and anaerobic power, and a monthly testing schedule for resting, maximal and recovery heart rate and maximum oxygen uptake. The data were analyzed by a one-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test was applied to judge appropriate contrasts. The results indicated that the 18 weeks of wrestling training had a significant (p. < .05) effect on maximum oxygen uptake, resting and recovery heart rate and the heart rate after 12 minutes of submaximal work. There were apparent differences in the other parameters investigated, however, they were not significant. The unavoidable interventions in the training program were the examination period and the Christmas holidays which extended from December sixth to the 18th and December 19th to January third, respectively. The interventions were detrimental to the fitness level of the present sample. The test values obtained immediately following the intervention period were less favourable than the pretraining values for all parameters investigated with the exception of the five minute recovery heart rate following 12 minutes of submaximal work. This finding indicated that the training effect that had occurred prior to the intervention period had totally deteriorated over the intervention period. Peak levels of fitness were achieved just prior to the College and National championships, thus suggestingvthat the wrestlers were not experiencing symptoms of overtraining or had reached peak fitness levels at an earlier date and were now at a maintainance or detraining state.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectSports Physiological aspects.
dc.subjectWrestling Training.
dc.titleEffect of seasonal wrestling training and unavoidable interventions on selected physiological parameters / by Nick Cipriano. --
etd.degree.nameM.Sc.
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplineKinesiology
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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