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dc.contributor.advisorHutchison, Leonard
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Steen Peder Korsgaard
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-28T18:35:03Z
dc.date.available2011-04-28T18:35:03Z
dc.date.created2009-09
dc.date.issued2011-04-28T18:35:03Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/82
dc.description.abstractBlue stain, caused by members of the Ophiostomatales, is of concern to the forest industry because it can quickly devalue timber by penetrating deep into the sapwood and creating dark blue to black staining. These fungi depend on insect vectors, such as bark beetles (Family Scolytidae), for the dispersal of their spores. Through a series of two field surveys, the objective of this thesis was to examine the diversity of ophiostomatoid fungi and their associated bark beetles in the Thunder Bay region, because of little research having been done on this topic in northwestern Ontario.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectBark beetlesen_US
dc.subjectOntario, Northwesternen_US
dc.subjectBlue stainen_US
dc.subjectJack pineen_US
dc.subjectDiseases and pestsen_US
dc.subjectOntarioen_US
dc.subjectThunder Bay regionen_US
dc.subjectWhite spruceen_US
dc.titleAn Examination of bark beetles and their associated blue stain fungi on boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and white spruce (Picea glauca) in the Thunder Bay Regionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineForestry and the Forest Environmenten_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHausner, G.
dc.contributor.committeememberCarney, Joseph
dc.contributor.committeememberRoden, D.


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