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dc.contributor.advisorBowd, Alan
dc.contributor.authorMilne, Lynda M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T13:35:10Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T13:35:10Z
dc.date.created1990
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/876
dc.description.abstractResearch has suggested that students with learning disabilities can became actively involved in their cun learning. A metacognitive orientation provides a conceptual base on which to build instructional interventions. In this study twenty students with learning disabilities in special classes in Thunder Bay participated. Students were From three intact classes at different schools. Three general expectations guided the investigation: First, through explicit teaching, students with learning disabilities can be instructed to employ self-questioning learning strategies for identification cf main ideas in a reading passage; Second, reading comprehension will be enhanced through metacognitive training as measured by: Miscue Analysis; Canadian Tests of Basic Skills. Form 3 and 4:.- and Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests. Form 1 and g. Third, students who perceive an external control of reinforcements, as measured by the Intellectual Achievement Responsibility Questionaire, will experience more difficulty using an intervention strategy. A simple pre-posttest design was used supplemented with observational and interview methods. The comprehension subtests of Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test. Form 1 (MacGinitie, Kamons, Koualski & MacGinitie, 1979) and Canadian Tests of Basic Skills. Form 3 (King & Hieryonymus, 1975) were administered to each student and baselines for reading comprehension established. Using a reciprocal teaching procedure, a self-questioning strategy was developed while studying a Canadian novel. Hunter in the Dark by M. Hughes. Miscue analysis and observation were employed to monitor the training sessions. Results indicated that the participants’ reading comprehension did improve on all criteria, miscue analysis and Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test were at a statistical significant level. The students’ belief in their own control, as measured by the Intellectual Achievement Responsibility questionnaire, was found not to be a predictor of achievement. Interventions which incorporate a teaching methodology that promotes strategic learning appear to hold the most promise for enabling students with learning disabilities to become more successful learners.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectLearning disabilities.
dc.subjectMetacognition.
dc.subjectReading comprehension Study and teaching.
dc.titleUsing metacognitive strategies to enhance reading comprehension for students with learning disabilities / by Lynda M. Milne. --
etd.degree.nameM.Ed.
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplineEducation
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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