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dc.contributor.advisorBauman, E.
dc.contributor.authorWhiffen, Arlene D.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T14:03:55Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T14:03:55Z
dc.date.created1991.
dc.date.submitted1991
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/961
dc.description.abstractThe effects of early education on later social, adaptive and behavioural functioning was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist and the Teacher’s Report Form. Twenty- five primary grade children who had been previously exposed to a pre school programme were compared with twenty- five children who were either cared for by a babysitter or a parent at home prior to entering the primary grade. Results indicated that children exposed to an early education programme were more likely to be rated by parents as socially withdrawn, that is, having poor peer relations, feeling persecuted, preferring to be alone and being teased. In addition, children cared for by a parent in the home, as opposed to a babysitter, were rated by parents as less involved in social activitiies, i.e., sports, clubs. Teacher’s described children raised by a babysitter as having anxious qualities such as being shy, timid and clinging to adults. Correlations between length of care and the dependent variables and the association between parent and teacher ratings on various sub- scales of the Child Behavior Checklist and the Teacher’s Report Form are also discussed. The social Implications of these findings are reviewed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Preschool
dc.subjectChild psychology.
dc.titleEffects of early education on later social, adaptative and behavioural functioning / by Arlene D. Whiffen.
etd.degree.nameM.A.
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplinePsychology
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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