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An investigation of the role of the amygdala in taste aversion learning

dc.contributor.authorArthur, James Brody
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-19T20:01:43Z
dc.date.available2011-07-19T20:01:43Z
dc.date.created1974
dc.date.issued1974
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/101
dc.description.abstractContemporary theories of amygdaloid function postulate that the amygdala is involved in the association of events with aversive consequences or in the inhibition of responses. Experiment 1 investigated the possibility that the amygdala is necessary for the learning of a conditioned taste aversion, a task requiring the association of taste with gastric distress and subsequent response inhibition. The performance of a group of intact rats was compared with that of two groups of rats with basolateral or corticomedial amygdaloid lesions. Since the groups of rats with amygdaloid lesions were impaired in the task, it was suggested that the amygdala is involved in the successful acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectTasteen_US
dc.subjectAmygdaloid bodyen_US
dc.titleAn investigation of the role of the amygdala in taste aversion learningen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Arts
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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