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The Infant feeding experiences of urban Aboriginal mothers : implications for universal breastfeeding policy

dc.contributor.advisorWakewich, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorGauld, Tara K.
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-14T20:12:31Z
dc.date.available2012-05-14T20:12:31Z
dc.date.created2009-09
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/139
dc.description.abstractIn Canada breastfeeding rates are lower among marginalized women and studies have demonstrated that successful and exclusive breastfeeding for the recommended six months frequently requires an extensive support system, one that is often absent among marginalized women. The purpose of this study was to explore the infant feeding decisions and experiences of urban Aboriginal women, the factors that influenced their decisions, and the implications of universal breastfeeding policy for Aboriginal women. Utilizing feminist qualitative methodology, I interviewed seven Aboriginal women and seven health and social service professionals providing services to Aboriginal women in Thunder Bay, Ontario.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectBreast Feedingen_US
dc.subjectNative womenen_US
dc.subjectHealth and hygieneen_US
dc.subjectNative childrenen_US
dc.titleThe Infant feeding experiences of urban Aboriginal mothers : implications for universal breastfeeding policyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAriss, Rachel
dc.contributor.committeememberKatt, Mae


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