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Systematic literature search on health promotion strategies for adults with intellectual disabilities

dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorMills, Krista
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T19:20:25Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T19:20:25Z
dc.date.created2009
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/1606
dc.description.abstractIntellectual disability (ID) is not a disease itself, rather it is a condition that is characterized by significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptation in conceptual and practical skills (van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk & Walsh, 2008); though engaging in community living and social skills can also be affected (Fisher, 2004). Examples of adaptation skills include communication, self-care, and self-direction. Diagnosing the presence of ID is usually conducted by a psychologist using established criteria including having an intelligence quotient (IQ) score of 70 or below, with an onset of the condition before the age of 18 (APA, 1994). There are a number of terms that have been used by healthcare professionals to define intellectual disability. The term “mental retardation”, though still used within the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), is currently considered unacceptable by most (World Health Organization, 2001), The term intellectual disability (ID) is generally preferred, and will be used in this paper,
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectPeople with mental disabilities
dc.subjectHealth promotion
dc.subjectHealth and hygiene
dc.titleSystematic literature search on health promotion strategies for adults with intellectual disabilities
dc.typeThesis
etd.degree.nameMaster of Public Health
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplinePublic Health
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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