Show simple item record

Women and work: analyzing the mixed economy in Qikiqtarjuaq, Nunavut

dc.contributor.advisorDowsley, Martha
dc.contributor.authorInksetter, Jocelyn B.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-11T03:06:42Z
dc.date.available2012-11-11T03:06:42Z
dc.date.created2012-04
dc.date.issued2012-11-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/278
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the condition of the mixed economy from the perspective of women's work in the Nunavut community of Qikiqtarjuaq. The focus of the project was to decide if the mixed economy persists in Inuit communities today, or if Inuit have moved into a new form of economy. I explored two definitions of the mixed economy. First, that as a group, women divide their time approximately evenly between monetary and subsistence pursuits; and second, that women devote their time to activities which support their male partners in hunting. A survey was used as the primary research tool to gather data from 103 women regarding how they spent their time over a one month period in spring 2010.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectWomen & worken_US
dc.subjectMixed economyen_US
dc.subjectGender & worken_US
dc.subjectQikiqtarjuaq, Nunavuten_US
dc.titleWomen and work: analyzing the mixed economy in Qikiqtarjuaq, Nunavuten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Studiesen_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Studies : Northern Environments & Culturesen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStewart, Robert
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Mitchell


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record