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Analysis of the change in golf swing kinematics associated with learning

dc.contributor.authorLamb, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T20:14:14Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T20:14:14Z
dc.date.created2005
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/3316
dc.description.abstractSuccess in golf depends on the precise timing and coordination of a complex movement pattern. Because of the time consuming nature of learning the golf swing, it is important to establish a more efficient teaching and learning strategy. Virtually Perfect Golf® (VPG) offers the student concurrent knowledge of performance combined with the company’s representation of the correct movement. The information is relayed to the student through the VPG glasses connected to one of three cameras situated around the student. This research investigates the validity of the VPG learning system as a teaching and learning tool for beginner golfers. A multiple baseline single subject design was used to evaluate the effect of the intervention on each individual. Data for the angular displacement of the left elbow, spine, and right and left legs, as well as the linear displacement of the head and linear speed of the left wrist were collected at five critical events during the golf swing to analyze the movement kinematics following VPG interventions. The results indicated that each of the participants used the information from the intervention differently as changes in movement kinematics were not consistent. Participants that did not possess an already existing movement pattern gained information about distal movements of the golf swing from viewing the VPG model. All participants showed stability in their performance on several variables after the final intervention. The results of this study suggest that future learning studies consider the use of single subject designs to describe how individuals react to changes in the learning environment. The use of kinematic measures as dependent variables provided unique information compared to past studies that have used movement outcomes as dependent measures.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectGolf (Study and teaching)
dc.subjectKinematics
dc.titleAnalysis of the change in golf swing kinematics associated with learning
dc.typeThesis
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplineKinesiology
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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