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Environmental drivers of succession in jack pine-dominated stands of boreal Ontario

dc.contributor.advisorMorris, David
dc.contributor.authorLongpre, Trevor William F.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T13:20:49Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T13:20:49Z
dc.date.created2007
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/3715
dc.description.abstractSpanning boreal Ontario, photo chronosequencing was used to observe change through time in 178 stands comprised at least in part by jack pine (Pinus bansiana Lamb.). Linked to growth and yield monitoring plot networks and a national climate model, observed succession was associated to 17 environmental attributes specific to geographic location, topography, soil conditions, and climate. Through the application of two non-parametric analytical techniques: regression trees and survival analysis, three fundamental ecological relationships to succession were identified. Deep sands were found to be the most influential ecological driver of succession in jack pine-dominated stands of boreal Ontario, followed by slope gradient and precipitation during the growing season. Derived cumulative survival probability functions for each of these variables offers tangible means by which forest forecast models in the region can be empirically refined.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectTaiga ecology (Ontario, Northern)
dc.subjectForest ecology (Ontario, Northern)
dc.subjectPlant succession
dc.subjectPhoto chronosequencing
dc.titleEnvironmental drivers of succession in jack pine-dominated stands of boreal Ontario
dc.typeThesis
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science
etd.degree.levelMaster
etd.degree.disciplineForestry and the Forest Environment
etd.degree.grantorLakehead University


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