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dc.contributor.advisorRussell, Connie
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-01T19:43:52Z
dc.date.available2018-11-01T19:43:52Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca:7070/handle/2453/4292
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of spending time outdoors and connecting with the natural world are becoming increasingly recognized, with outdoor education gaining more acceptance and visibility in our society. Unfortunately, traditional schools in Ontario, Canada have not yet shown that they are well-equipped to offer all students access to the benefits provided by outdoor instruction. In my experience as an intermediate teacher, I have found that grade 7 and 8 students feel disconnected from the natural world, yet I and my fellow educators make few attempts to give them the tools they need to see how interconnected they are with the environment around them. In order to understand why other intermediate educators stay indoors and do not take advantage of the outdoor learning spaces and tools around them, I interviewed seven grade 7 and 8 teachers. The teachers all work for the same school board, range in age and experience, and teach in both rural and urban settings. Most of the teachers interviewed had never really considered the advantages of taking their students outdoors. They identified barriers to getting outdoors like curricular expectations, reliance on technology for instruction, and their students’ reactions to learning outdoors. In order for intermediate teachers to get outside to instruct their students, they will require professional development, including building their knowledge of the benefits of going outside to meet curricular expectations, and time to work on how best to integrate outdoor instruction into their teaching practices. Until the education system fully acknowledges the importance of students learning outside and better supports teachers to do so, it will be up to individual teachers to do what is best for their intermediate students and get outside as often as possible to meet curricular expectations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental educationen_US
dc.subjectBenefits of learning outdoorsen_US
dc.subjectOutdoor educationen_US
dc.titleWhy don't intermediate teachers go outside?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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