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dc.contributor.advisorAgbo, Seth
dc.contributor.authorJecker, Justine
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T12:52:33Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T12:52:33Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca:7070/handle/2453/4355
dc.description.abstractIn northwestern Ontario, interprofessional collaboration is needed to improve access to healthcare services for Indigenous people. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada identified 94 Calls to Action, four of which guided the design of this community action research project (No.18: acknowledge previous health policy is responsible for Indigenous health, No.19: identify appropriate health services, No.22: recognize the value of traditional health practices; No.23: provide competency training for health professionals). The purpose of this study was to examine whether the teaching of six interprofessional competencies to healthcare teams servicing northern First Nation communities enhances: 1) interprofessional collaboration and 2) Indigenous healthcare access. A two-eyed seeing approach supported an interprofessional collaboration (IPC) training intervention involving 30 participants. A convergent parallel mixed methods design, including a post-post test design survey and second-order narratives, supported the generation of community action-oriented goals. A statistically significant difference in each of the six interprofessional competency domains was found following the training. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that access to healthcare services does improve following collaboration training. The mixed analysis demonstrated that sustainable community resources focused on healthcare access were developed as a result of the action-oriented goals. Northern First Nation communities can benefit directly and indirectly from interprofessional competency training for the purpose of improving access to healthcare services. By incorporating Indigenous ways of knowing within a community action research framework, Calls to Action can be enacted.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous healthcare accessen_US
dc.subjectInterprofessional collaborationen_US
dc.subjectFirst Nation communities healthcare accessen_US
dc.titleImproving Indigenous access to healthcare services through interprofessional collaborationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDrake, Susan
dc.contributor.committeememberBerger, Paul


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