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dc.contributor.advisorMeyer, Wieste
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T12:33:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T12:33:26Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca:7070/handle/2453/4365
dc.description.abstractThe introduction of invasive, non-native earthworms into forest ecosystems has increased as recreational, industrial, and commercial activities increase in northern Ontario. The presence of these ecosystem engineers in previously uninvaded ecosystems has resulted in significant changes in soil structure, vegetation communities and soil organic carbon. In this study, field activities gathered samples of earthworms and soil from five different sites in the Thunder Bay district. Lab analysis was then completed to determine the relationships between ash-free dry mass of earthworms, total organic carbon, soil texture, pH and understory species richness. Results indicated that the presence of earthworms in northern boreal hardwood forest ecosystems has led to significant decreases in carbon storage of approximately 7%. This reduction in soil carbon storage may result in an increased release of carbon emissions and the reduction of the efficacy of the boreal forest as a critical global carbon sink.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectBiomixingen_US
dc.subjectBoreal foresten_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_US
dc.subjectEarthwormsen_US
dc.subjectDetritivoreen_US
dc.subjectLumbricidaeen_US
dc.titleImpacts of invasive earthworms on carbon storage in southern boreal hardwood forestsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameHonours Bachelor of Science in Forestryen_US
etd.degree.levelBacheloren_US
etd.degree.disciplineNatural Resources Managementen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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