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Response of Cypripedium and Goodyera to disturbance in the Thunder Bay area

dc.contributor.advisorMcLaren, Brian
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-17T18:14:12Z
dc.date.available2019-10-17T18:14:12Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/4426
dc.description.abstractOrchids constitute a family of rare plants on the landscape that are facing additional threats from anthropogenic changes to their habitat. Orchids have very specific habitat requirements and can be used as early indicators of changing ecosystems and forest health. The purpose of this study is to update the status of Cypripedium spp. and Goodyera spp. in the Thunder Bay area in response to change in habitat. The city and surrounding area have been developed further in recent years. Locations that were once ideal habitats for certain orchid species, such as wetland habitats, have been lost. In contrast, orchid populations on the Sibley Peninsula, part of which is protected as Sleeping Giant Provincial Park, have continued to thrive, likely due to the seclusion of some of the locations. As a means to preserve orchids, conservation efforts that focus on increasing local stewardship should be implemented.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectClaude E. Garton Herbariumen_US
dc.subjectOrchidsen_US
dc.subjectCypripedium spp.en_US
dc.subjectGoodyera spp.en_US
dc.subjectOrchid populations (Sibley Peninsula)en_US
dc.titleResponse of Cypripedium and Goodyera to disturbance in the Thunder Bay areaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameHonours Bachelor of Environmental Managementen_US
etd.degree.levelBacheloren_US
etd.degree.disciplineNatural Resources Managementen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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