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An arts-informed study of Artemis and Apollo: implications for teachers

dc.contributor.advisorBlaikie, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorKailik, Alyson
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-30T19:45:54Z
dc.date.available2019-10-30T19:45:54Z
dc.date.created2008
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/4448
dc.description.abstractUsing arts-informed research and the intuitive artistic processes of drawing and painting I searched for visual symbols and feelings in the myths of Artemis and Apollo. Visual imagery, symbols and meaning provide a different understanding from standard mythological texts. Artemis and Apollo represent the dualities of nature and the human sphere. Artemis is a protector of young children and emerges as a role model for young women today, while Apollo is associated strongly with the passing of time and agriculture. Ways of understanding Artemis and Apollo that are relevant to youth and the teaching of mythology can inform secondary level classrooms in Ontario. Artemis and Apollo symbolize roles relating to sexuality and gender; lifecycles; and most importantly the balance between wilderness and civilization as constructed by human.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectArts-informed educational researchen_US
dc.subjectMythologyen_US
dc.titleAn arts-informed study of Artemis and Apollo: implications for teachersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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