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dc.contributor.advisorMushquash, Aislin
dc.contributor.authorMohammed, Shakira
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-14T13:53:22Z
dc.date.available2020-09-14T13:53:22Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca:7070/handle/2453/4685
dc.description.abstractEmerging adulthood (ages 18-29) is recognized as a stage associated with unique developmental needs and transitions. Moving from high school to university is one life transition that demands for multiple adjustments and leaves emerging adults at risk for maladjustment (e.g., experiencing psychological or academic distress). As such, it is important to examine explanatory models of factors that predict and prevent maladjustment in first-year university students. The current study tested a moderation model to explain maladjustment in first-year university students. It was proposed that socially prescribed perfectionism would be associated with greater maladjustment (operationalized in the current study as poor psychological well-being, depressive symptoms, and academic distress), and mattering (i.e., feeling important and significant to others) would be associated with lower maladjustment. Moreover, it was hypothesized that mattering would be a significant moderator of the relationship between socially prescribed perfectionism and maladjustment. First-year university students (N = 152) at Lakehead University completed a series of self-report measures assessing socially prescribed perfectionism, mattering, psychological well-being, symptoms of depression, and academic distress. As expected, hierarchical regression analyses showed that socially prescribed perfectionism was a predictor of greater maladjustment, while mattering was a predictor of lower maladjustment. Further, mattering significantly moderated the association between socially prescribed perfectionism and depressive symptoms such that, low levels of mattering strengthened the relationship and high levels of mattering diminished the relationship. However, mattering did not significantly moderate the link between socially prescribed perfectionism and psychological well-being or academic distress. The results suggest the need for university institutions to consider mattering as a target to enhance university student well-being and academic success.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectTransition to post-secondary schoolen_US
dc.subjectMaladjustment in first-year university studentsen_US
dc.subjectPerfectionism and matteringen_US
dc.subjectEmerging adulthooden_US
dc.subjectPsychological well-being (university students)en_US
dc.titleA proposed moderation model of socially prescribed perfectionism and mattering to predict maladjustment in first-year university studentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychology : Clinicalen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaranzan, Amanda


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