Show simple item record

Individual differences in flirting and attractivity mating strategies: sex, gender, and the menstrual cycle

dc.contributor.advisorOinonen, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorDuchene, Katelyn M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-22T16:24:48Z
dc.date.available2014-01-22T16:24:48Z
dc.date.created2013-09
dc.date.issued2014-01-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/468
dc.description.abstractPrevious research suggests sex differences in mate preferences and mating strategies based on reproductive constraints (Buss, 2005). Furthermore, research has suggested that women's mating behaviours change across the menstrual cycle, with peaks in certain mating preferences and attraction strategies (i.e., short-term strategies) occurring when conception likelihood is highest. A goal of the current study was to develop a measure of flirting and mate attractivity behaviours that would allow for measurement of between- and within-sex differences in these behaviours. The study examined the relationship between gender identity (i.e., masculinity and femininity) and mating strategies, mating strategies in the context of the menstrual cycle, and sex differences in flirting “in person” versus “through technology” in 557 participants (463 women). After controlling for age, social desirability scores, and years of education, masculinity was positively associated with engagement in male-typical mating strategies in both sexes, while femininity was positively associated with engagement in female-typical mating strategies for women only. In women, engagement in overall mate attraction behaviours increased with conception likelihood, however, short-term (ST) mate attraction behaviours did not show stronger associations with fertility than long-term (LT) mate attraction behaviours. Finally, while women reported flirting more in person and through technology relative to men, there was no evidence that women engaged in relatively more flirting through technology than in-person as compared to men. These findings suggest that one’s gender orientation and women’s conception likelihood are associated with the choice and frequency of mate attractivity behaviours, and suggest value in examining within-sex individual difference variables in predicting mate attraction behaviours.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectMating strategiesen_US
dc.subjectSex differences in long-term matingen_US
dc.subjectSex differences in short-term matingen_US
dc.subjectSociosexual orientationen_US
dc.subjectMating strategy of flirtingen_US
dc.subjectMenstrual cycle & conception likelihooden_US
dc.subjectMenstrual cycle effect on sexual interest & strategiesen_US
dc.titleIndividual differences in flirting and attractivity mating strategies: sex, gender, and the menstrual cycleen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychology : Clinicalen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTan, Josephine
dc.contributor.committeememberStroink, Mirella


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record