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An analysis of the perceived effects of Indigenous spirituality on substance use recovery in Northwestern Ontario

dc.contributor.authorSweers, Breanna
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-18T17:32:36Z
dc.date.available2021-10-18T17:32:36Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/4882
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to understand the perceived effects of Indigenous spirituality on healing from substance use in Northwestern Ontario. This study was based on the work of Dilico Anishinabek Family Care, a Thunder Bay organization actively involved in addiction treatment using Anishnawbe culture and spirituality. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine Indigenous participants to understand the perceived benefits of spirituality in addictions recovery. These participants were either currently using substances, or had a history of substance use but were in recovery and had taken part in treatment at Dilico. Recruitment utilized advertisements and a snowball sampling method. Traditional spirituality was perceived to be important in healing from substance use. This importance was predominantly relational, as participants described building connections to the self, to the Creator, and others. Additionally, participants identified the COVID-19 pandemic and housing instability as significant barriers to practicing their spirituality and thus, carrying out their recovery plans. Participants also described that living off-reserve limited their ability to access certain ceremonies, medicines, or practices. These findings have implications for considering tailored treatment for Indigenous adults seeking treatment for substance use difficulties.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous spiritualityen_US
dc.subjectAddiction treatment using Anishnawbe culture and spiritualityen_US
dc.subjectEffects of spirituality (substance use treatment)en_US
dc.titleAn analysis of the perceived effects of Indigenous spirituality on substance use recovery in Northwestern Ontarioen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Social Worken_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplineSocial Worken_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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