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Prevalence of multimorbidity in adults with cancer, and associated health service utilization in Ontario, Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort study

dc.contributor.authorKone Pefoyo, Anna
dc.contributor.authorScharf, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-13T15:10:29Z
dc.date.available2021-12-13T15:10:29Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationKoné, A.P., Scharf, D. Prevalence of multimorbidity in adults with cancer, and associated health service utilization in Ontario, Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort study. BMC Cancer 21, 406 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-021-08102-1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/4901
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Springer Nature in BMC Cancer on April 14, 2021, available online: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-021-08102-1
dc.description.abstractBackground: The majority of people with cancer have at least one other chronic health condition. With each additional chronic disease, the complexity of their care increases, as does the potential for negative outcomes including premature death. In this paper, we describe cancer patients’ clinical complexity (i.e., multimorbidity; MMB) in order to inform strategic efforts to improve care and outcomes for people with cancer of all types and commonly occurring chronic diseases. Methods: We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of adults diagnosed with cancer between 2003 and 2013 (N = 601,331) identified in Ontario, Canada healthcare administrative data. During a five to 15-year follow-up period (through March 2018), we identified up to 16 co-occurring conditions and patient outcomes for the cohort, including health service utilization and death. Results: MMB was extremely common, affecting more than 91% of people with cancer. Nearly one quarter (23%) of the population had five or more co-occurring conditions. While we saw no differences in MMB between sexes, MMB prevalence and level increased with age. MMB prevalence and type of co-occurring conditions also varied by cancer type. Overall, MMB was associated with higher rates of health service utilization and mortality, regardless of other patient characteristics, and specific conditions differentially impacted these rates. Conclusions: People with cancer are likely to have at least one other chronic medical condition and the presence of MMB negatively affects health service utilization and risk of premature death. These findings can help motivate and inform health system advances to improve care quality and outcomes for people with cancer and MMB.en_US
dc.description.uri
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectMultimorbidityen_US
dc.subjectChronic diseaseen_US
dc.subjectHealth service utilizationen_US
dc.subjectMortalityen_US
dc.titlePrevalence of multimorbidity in adults with cancer, and associated health service utilization in Ontario, Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-021-08102-1en_US


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    Through its graduate program offerings in Public Health and Health Sciences, the Department of Health Sciences provides students with an understanding of the complexities of public health and health sciences

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