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Personality and early maladaptive schemas differentiating persons who engage in infrequent versus pathological non-suicidal self-injury

dc.contributor.advisorTan, Josephine
dc.contributor.advisorVoros, Peter
dc.contributor.authorArthurs, Sarah D.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-22T16:44:32Z
dc.date.available2014-01-22T16:44:32Z
dc.date.created2012-08
dc.date.issued2014-01-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://knowledgecommons.lakeheadu.ca/handle/2453/539
dc.description.abstractNon-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is used as a coping mechanism for regulating emotions and communicating distress. Research has contributed to understanding the prevalence, forms, and functions of NSSI, but little is known about the characteristics that distinguish individuals who have a brief NSSI history from those who repetitively self-harm. One hundred and fifty-six nonclinical participants selected from a larger pool and matched on sex, age, and clinical status were classified into a non-pathological NSSI group (less than 10 NSSI incidents and less than 3 methods), a pathological NSSI group (10 or more NSSI incidents or 3 or more methods), and a control group (no history of NSSI). The groups were then compared on the Big Five Inventory (BFI) and the Early Maladaptive Schema Questionnaire - Short Form (EMSQ-SF), assessing personality and cognitive distortions, respectively.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectNon-suicidal self injuryen_US
dc.subjectPersonalityen_US
dc.subjectCognitive schemaen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.titlePersonality and early maladaptive schemas differentiating persons who engage in infrequent versus pathological non-suicidal self-injuryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.degree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.degree.levelMasteren_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychology : Clinicalen_US
etd.degree.grantorLakehead Universityen_US


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